3 Lies People Tell Themselves About Financial Advisors

posted on 06-07-2019

I recently met someone who didn't think that he needed a financial advisor. It took two phone calls from me and a referral from a family member to convince him to hear what I had to say. 

It turns out he didn't want to see a financial advisor because he felt that he didn't have enough money, and he didn't want to be forced to save more money than he could afford. It took some convincing, but in the end, he would become my client.

Too many people think they don't need or can't have a financial advisor. In fact, there are three main reasons why investors don't get an advisor, and I'm going to tell you about them. But first, let me tell you more about my client...

His assumption was a major misunderstanding of what financial advisors do. We don't force people to save if they can't afford it; we help them budget so that they can afford it. I explained to him that my job is not to convince him that he needs to save more money. My job is to make sure that he is saving for his goals and stays on track toward his personal goals with the right investment strategy. 

We reviewed his savings and invested his $20,000 of cash, which was in a high interest savings account, into a well-diversified fixed income portfolio with a little bit of dividend investing.  We agreed that I would call him once a year to invest the cash savings that he accumulates throughout the year, no more, no less.  

In the end, my client recognized the value of having a financial advisor. But he wasn't alone in thinking he didn't need one.

I want to tell you about three primary reasons why people don't get an advisor. Here they are.

1. I Don't Have The Time.

Being too busy to visit a financial advisor every quarter is just not good enough. On the contrary, a financial advisor is supposed to help you save time by reviewing your investment options and making investment suggestions based on your personal goals. As your goals change over time, so will your investment strategy. Your financial advisor will help make a smooth transition between different stages of your life such as from working into retirement. 

Having a financial advisor allows you to focus on other aspects of your life such as your career, family and friends. Do you have the time to track market fluctuations and adjust your portfolio accordingly? Do you have time to allocate the perfect amount of fixed income and equities in your portfolio based on your risk tolerance and time horizon? Many people just don't have the time for that.

2. I Don't Have Enough Money.

Whether you are new to investing or have been managing your own investment portfolio for many years, it's always a good idea to get a second opinion from a financial advisor, no matter how much money you have.

A fresh pair of eyes to look over your current asset allocation versus your current financial goals is always a good financial decision, regardless of the value of your investment portfolio. All money -- no matter how much it's worth -- needs to have an investment strategy that maximizes your return based on your comfort level with risk. 

My colleague Amy Calistri couldn't agree more. That's why she has developed a three-pronged system she calls the Dividend Trifecta. It allows investors to profit while tailoring their portfolio to their risk tolerance. If you want 7.2% yields with 43% safer returns than traditional investing, you'll want to check this out.

3. I Don't Know How To Choose The Right Advisor.

You need the best financial advisor out there -- so how do you find her?

Try starting with your bank. 

Financial advisors in a bank usually share the same philosophy as the institution -- so if you love their banking services, you will most likely love their financial advice.

Depending on why you need a financial advisor, you can determine which type of advisor is the best for you. 

Maybe you need a financial advisor because you don't have time to manage and research your investments; maybe you need a financial advisor because you have an idea of the types of investments you want and you just need some guidance to make the final decisions; or maybe you need a financial advisor because you already know which investments you want and you just need someone to process the transactions for you. 

As you can see, financial advisors can bring a lot of value to your investment portfolio -- you just need to find the right advisor for you.

The Investing Answer:  Choosing the best financial advisor is a decision based on compatibility and personality. If you don't have a good relationship with your financial advisor then they probably won't understand your needs. Try to find a financial advisor with qualities that you look for in friends -- but who also have a degree in finance. The best financial advisor is the one who has the lowest fees and access to the investments that you want to buy.

by Christian Hudspeth What's even better than earning rewards for spending on your credit cards? Getting paid hundreds of dollars worth in sign-up bonuses in three months or sooner -- just for tr...
by Christian Hudspeth Tired of dragging credit card debt around with you? Taking 15 minutes to transfer your debt to a credit card with generous balance transfer perks could save you thousands in...
by Christian Hudspeth If you're going to spend money anyway, then why not get paid for it?Whether you're looking for credit cards with up to 6% cash back, double flight miles, or even a free hote...
by Christian HudspethIn times where interest rates are on the rise, you may start hearing financial advisors and bankers sing the praises of an income strategy called "CD laddering" (short for ce...
by Susan Campbell Those of us familiar with selling property know real estate agents don't come cheap. With real estate agent commission and fees amounting to as much as 6% of the sel...
Beverly Harzog is a nationally recognized credit card expert, author, and consumer advocate. She blogs about credit cards at BeverlyHarzog.com. Being in credit card debt is the pits. I've bee...
by Christian Hudspeth If you haven't already felt the pressure to refinance your mortgage, you're probably really feeling it now. Mortgage rates are still hovering near historic lows. But ...
by Christian Hudspeth If you or someone you know is thinking about getting a home mortgage, you may want to know about the thousands of dollars in hidden charges that some lenders are quietly...
by Christian Hudspeth Money market accounts (MMAs) and savings accounts make great places to set aside your emergency fund money and earn some interest income at the same time.Simply put, these s...
by Christian Hudspeth It's true that auto loans and home loans offer attractively-low annual percentage rates (APRs), while credit cards offer borrowing power without the risk of ever seeing the ...
by Christian HudspethWant to keep your emergency fund safe while earning interest yields that are three to five times higher than a typical savings account? Putting your money into an FDIC-insure...
by Christian Hudspeth Question: Hi there. I need your advice. I'm only 19 and I really need to start investing. Where can I start? -- Tirelo M., Gaborone, Botswana Answer: You've defini...