Investing Answers Building and Protecting Your Wealth through Education Publisher of The Next Banks That Could Fail
Investing Answers Building and Protecting Your Wealth through Education Publisher of The Next Banks That Could Fail

30-Day Annualized Yield

What it is:

The 30-day annualized yield is a measure of the yearly rate paid to investors of an interest-bearing account, based on the returns earned in a 30-day period.
 

How it works (Example):

The 30-day annualized yield is a measure of return usually used for mutual funds. It is found by dividing the net investment income per share earned during a 30-day period by the maximum offering price per share on the last day of that period, according to the following formula: 

30-Day Annualized Yield = 2[((a-b/cd) + 1)6 -1]

Where: 

a = dividends and interest earned during the period. 

b = expenses accrued for the period (net of reimbursements). 

c = the average daily number of shares outstanding during the period that were entitled to receive dividends. 

d = the maximum offering price per share on the last day of the period. 

Let's assume the Company XYZ mutual fund needs to calculate its 30-day annualized yield. If the fund earned $10,000 of dividends and interest during the period, recorded $5,000 of expenses during the period, owned 100,000 shares that were entitled to receive dividends, and the maximum offering price on the 30th day of the period was $45, then by using the formula above, we can calculate that the XYZ fund's 30-day annualized yield was:

Yield = 2[(($10,000 - $5,000 / 100,000 x $45)+1)6 - 1]
= 0.01337 or 1.337%

Why it Matters:

It is important to note that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) strictly defines the 30-day annualized yield formula and use. It also provides strict guidelines for calculating the interest income, accounting for the discounts or premiums on certain securities, tallying expenses, and undeclared earned income that affect the calculations.

The 30-day annualized yield gives investors a way to compare their interest-bearing accounts or mutual fund returns. The measure tells investors what the fund would yield in a year if it continued on its current earnings path. Without this and other standardized disclosures, financial institutions could manipulate their yield calculations. 

Related Terms View All
  • Auction Market
    Though most of the trading is done via computer, auction markets can also be operated via...
  • Best Execution
    Let's assume you place an order to buy 100 shares of Company XYZ stock. The current quote...
  • Book-Entry Savings Bond
    Savings bonds are bonds issued by the U.S. government at face values ranging from $50 to...
  • Break-Even Point
    The basic idea behind break-even point is to calculate the point at which revenues begin...
  • Calendar Year
    If Company XYZ starts its fiscal year on January 1 and ends its fiscal year on December...